Saturday, March 18, 2006

Sub Standard Spending In Quebec

I'm selling my kayac this spring and getting someting a little less environmentally friendly, either a power boat or a 'personal water craft', Now I find out the Navy's old subs are selling for less than five bucks.

Navy sells sub for $4

By Jennifer Taplin
The Daily News

DARTMOUTH - Decommissioned submarines are going cheap. For $4, a Quebec museum bought one of the Oberon-class submarines sitting dockside in Dartmouth.

The Musee de la Mer de Pointe-au-Pere near Rimouski, Que., paid $4 plus tax in October for one of the subs tucked away in the harbour.

HMCS Onondaga will be towed out of port this summer to its new home in Quebec.

It is slated to open to the public on June 1, 2007.

"We think that it will bring a lot of people here," said Annemarie Bourassa, assistant director of the museum.

It will be the only submarine in Canada on display for the public.

The total cost of the project - with planning, preparation, transport, and construction - is $2.6 million. Provincial and federal governments are contributing, and so are the people and businesses of Rimouski.
Navy sells sub for $4

By Jennifer Taplin
The Daily News

DARTMOUTH - Decommissioned submarines are going cheap. For $4, a Quebec museum bought one of the Oberon-class submarines sitting dockside in Dartmouth.

The Musee de la Mer de Pointe-au-Pere near Rimouski, Que., paid $4 plus tax in October for one of the subs tucked away in the harbour.

HMCS Onondaga will be towed out of port this summer to its new home in Quebec.

It is slated to open to the public on June 1, 2007.

"We think that it will bring a lot of people here," said Annemarie Bourassa, assistant director of the museum.

It will be the only submarine in Canada on display for the public.

The total cost of the project - with planning, preparation, transport, and construction - is $2.6 million. Provincial and federal governments are contributing, and so are the people and businesses of Rimouski.

"Rimouski is not a big city and there's not a lot of big tourist attractions, so there's a lot of people who are convinced that this will be good for everyone."

The Onondaga was originally expected to go to the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa.

Bourassa said the museum bowed out when it tallied up how much it would cost to cut the sub into pieces to transport it to Ottawa.

"In our goals, we have to protect maritime heritage. If we don't have the submarine here, there won't be any more Oberon-class submarines in Canada. They will be lost for history."

The navy doesn't own the subs anymore. They're considered surplus equipment under defence department's Directorate of Disposal, Sales, Artifacts and Loans.

Navy Lieut. Paul Pendergast said the subs are classified as controlled goods, so they can't leave the country.

When the Onondaga departs, the three others will remain until a decision is made on their fate.

Essentially there are three options for the subs: sell them to a museum, sink them as an artificial reef, or break them up for scrap.

The Submarine Heritage Centre, of Barrow-in-Furness, England, proposed to buy one two years ago but the deal fell through. Pendergast said he didn't know why.

In 2004, Halifax Regional Municipality considered buying one of subs to use as a tourist attraction, but decided it would cost too much.

Provincial and Federal governments contributing; what else is new in Quebec?


"Rimouski is not a big city and there's not a lot of big tourist attractions, so there's a lot of people who are convinced that this will be good for everyone."

The Onondaga was originally expected to go to the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa.

Bourassa said the museum bowed out when it tallied up how much it would cost to cut the sub into pieces to transport it to Ottawa.

"In our goals, we have to protect maritime heritage. If we don't have the submarine here, there won't be any more Oberon-class submarines in Canada. They will be lost for history."

The navy doesn't own the subs anymore. They're considered surplus equipment under defence department's Directorate of Disposal, Sales, Artifacts and Loans.

Navy Lieut. Paul Pendergast said the subs are classified as controlled goods, so they can't leave the country.

When the Onondaga departs, the three others will remain until a decision is made on their fate.

Essentially there are three options for the subs: sell them to a museum, sink them as an artificial reef, or break them up for scrap.

The Submarine Heritage Centre, of Barrow-in-Furness, England, proposed to buy one two years ago but the deal fell through. Pendergast said he didn't know why.

In 2004, Halifax Regional Municipality considered buying one of subs to use as a tourist attraction, but decided it would cost too much.


Italics Mine

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